Structured Cabling in Dubai, UAE

The Importance of Structured Cabling

The world has changed. The way we work, the way we shop and entertain, the way we communicate, travel - the way we live - are all drastically different than just a few short years ago. Technology is better than it has even been. Communication is faster and expectations have never been higher. Today, information for virtually everything is at our fingertips and tomorrow's technology is limited only by our imagination. In this ever more demanding world of increased expectations and requirements, the pace of technology has not slowed. Our appetite for improving our lives and our businesses continues to drive forward. Now, more than ever, businesses need to focus on the IT basics - the supporting infrastructure that will bear the load and distribute your vital business information globally.

What Are the Benefits of Structured Cabling?

  Once again, organization is the key word here. With an organized structured cabling system the benefits are:
  1. MAC’s are much quicker due to the fact that they are done in the MDA versus running long patch cords from equipment racks.
  2. Potential for downtime is reduced as potential for human error is drastically reduced due to this organization.
  3. Time savings; cable and port tracing becomes a much easier job with a structured cabling system.
  4. Aesthetics; Never underestimate the looks! A structured cabling system will look much cleaner than a point to point method. Since the changes are done in the MDA versus at the hardware, the hardware can be cabled up and not touched in most instances. This allows the cabling in front of the switch to remain aesthetically pleasing.
What Are the Risks Of Not Switching to a Structured Cabling System?  Downtime! With an unorganized messy cabling infrastructure, mistakes are commonly made. Incorrect ports are unplugged. Even worse is the messy cabling that gets in the way. Trying to remove a single cable from a large tangled mess can cause stress on the other cables. This stress can lead to network and channel errors in the hardware that are very difficult to trace. Airflow: If a point to point method is used, the front and potentially the sides of the switch are congested with cabling bulk. This impedes the airflow that the switch needs to operate. This also translates to underfloor cooling; cabling congestion in this space hinders the airflow of the CRAC unit and can cause cooling issues.

Optical fibre cabling and Termination

A fiber optic cable is a network cable that contains strands of glass fibers inside an insulated casing. They're designed for long distance, very high performance data networking and telecommunications. Compared to wired cables, fiber optic cables provide higher bandwidth and can transmit data over longer distances. Fiber optic cables support much of the world's internet, cable television and telephone systems.

Advantages of Fiber Optic Cables

Fiber cables offer several advantages over traditional long-distance copper cabling.
  • Fiber optics have a higher capacity. The amount of network bandwidth a fiber cable can carry easily exceeds that of a copper cable with similar thickness. Fiber cables rated at 10 Gbps, 40 Gbps and even 100 Gbps are standard.
  • Since light can travel much longer distances down a fiber cable without losing its strength, it lessens the need for signal boosters.
  • Fiber is less susceptible to interference. A traditional network cable requires special shielding to protect it from electromagnetic interference. While this shielding helps, it is not sufficient to prevent interference when many cables are strung together in close proximity to each other. The physical properties of glass and fiber cables avoid most of these issues.
Fluke Test:
Whether installing new cable, or troubleshooting existing cable, cable testing plays an important role in the process. Common tests for datacom cabling include length, wiremap, attenuation, NEXT, DC loop resistance, and return loss. As networks evolve, so do the requirements of the cabling infrastructure to support them. New standards are continuously being developed to provide guidelines for cabling professionals when installing, testing, troubleshooting, and certifying either copper and fiber. Whether it's 10BASE-T, 100BASE-TX or 1000BASE-T, there are specific requirements and potential pitfalls in implementing these technologies. With 10GBASE-T, it becomes even more critical to keep current with the latest proliferations in cabling and cable testing. Cable testing provides a level of assurance that the installed cabling links provide the desired transmission capability to support the data communication desired by the users.